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    An Expert Dispels Common Myths About Meditation And Yoga

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    Asana and meditation are both essential components of yoga. They both complement one another and, as a result, are incomplete without one another. There are numerous misconceptions about these age-old practices, and because of these false notions, one does not approach them from the correct perspective, resulting in a lack of impact. So, let us clear the air by debunking some myths about both of these types of exercise.

    Myth: Because I have a hyperactive mind, meditation is not for me.

    When it comes to meditation, the human mind is both a problem and an antidote. We can’t change the mind’s basic nature of constantly producing thoughts.

    Myth: To meditate, I must sit cross-legged on the floor.

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    Meditation can take place anywhere, at any time, and by anyone. Yes, having a straight spine is recommended for maximum benefits, but if you can’t sit on the floor, it’s perfectly fine to sit on a chair or couch with some support. What matters is that you stay aware and alert throughout your meditation practice.

    Myth: Sleeping while meditating is acceptable.

    Fact: During meditation, one is expected to be very focused and aware of the present moment. Drowsiness or sleepiness during meditation defeats the purpose. Sleeping is a sign of a dull mind and a tired body. So, if you feel sleepy, get up, take a short walk, and then go back to bed.

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    An Expert Dispels Common Myths About Meditation And Yoga

    Myth: In order to practise, I must be thin and flexible.

    Yoga asanas are suitable for all body types and require no prior training. There is something for everyone to practise and benefit from, whether you are thin or fat, flexible or not, old or young, healthy or unwell.

    Myth: I am only a good practitioner if I practise advanced asanas.

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    Fact: Yoga asana is not about the complicated postures we see on social media. Yoga asana is a very process-oriented and non-competitive practice. What matters is how much awareness you can bring to yourself during the practice, which determines how far you progress in it.

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